Dogmatology Courses

1407 - Philosophy

   (Credits: 2)

After introducing philosophy and logic, this course surveys many key Western philosophical ideas and debates with a view to how they have affected theology and vice versa. The course closes with a study of Reformed philosophy, in particular the (Dooyeweerdian) Philosophy of the Cosmonomic Idea and the newer Reformed Epistemology of Alvin Plantinga, c.s. Fall Semester.

1408 - Introduction to Theology

   (Credits: 1)

This course explores what theology should be from the Reformed perspective. The starting point is A. Kuypers Principles of Sacred Theology. Topics discussed include the specific subject matter of theology, its relation to other disciplines, and the division of theology. Winter Semester.

1409 - Ecumenical Creeds

   (Credits: 2)

The study of the church’s creeds and confessions is also called symbolics. This course aims at a thorough knowledge of the Apostles, Nicene, and Athanasian Creeds, including both their history and content. Fall Semester.

1410 - Three Forms of Unity

   (Credits: 3)

The study of the church’s creeds and confessions is also called symbolics. This course focusses on a thorough knowledge of the Belgic Confession, the Heidelberg Catechism, and the Canons of Dort, the Reformed confessions which have become known as the Three Forms of Unity. Attention will be paid to both their history and content. Winter Semester.

2408 - Theological Foundations

   (Credits: 4)

This course explores the introductory and underlying questions, or prolegomena, of doctrinal studies. Topics include the nature, method, and source of dogmatics, both in the history of the church and today. This is followed by a study of how God reveals himself, particularly in his inspired Word. Fall Semester.

2409 - Doctrine of God

   (Credits: 2)

Using Holy Scripture as the foundation, this course explores the doctrines of our Triune God and his divine decree. Winter Semester.

2410 - Advanced Symbolics

   (Credits: 2)

Using the Three Forms of Unity as a reference point, the history and text of various significant confessions from the 16th century until today are studied. Special attention is given to the Westminster Standards. Winter Semester.

2411 - Apologetics

   (Credits: 2)

This course studies the history and methods of Christian apologetics – both negative and positive approaches – and equips students to defend their faith before the world. The first half of the course covers the biblical basis, history, and main schools of apologetics while the second half engages in the practice of apologetics. Winter Semester.

3409 - Creation and Anthropology

   (Credits: 4)

Using Holy Scripture as the foundation, this course explores the doctrine of the work of God in creation and providence, as well as topics dealing with humanity, sin, and covenant. Fall Semester.

3410 - Ethics

   (Credits: 2)

In this course students are introduced to the field of ethics as the study of “the good.” Various approaches to ethics are explored, followed by a study of the application of the Ten Commandments to the Christian life. Winter Semester.

4411 - Christology and Ecclesiology

   (Credits: 4)

Using Holy Scripture as the foundation, this course explores the doctrines of the person and work of Jesus Christ. In addition, attention will be given to the Bride of Christ, the church, and the means of grace, both preaching and the sacraments. Fall Semester.

4412 - Soteriology and Eschatology

   (Credits: 4)

Using Holy Scripture as the foundation, this course begins with the diverse aspects of our salvation and ends with the culmination of God’s redemptive work in final glory. Winter Semester.

4413 - Contemporary Issues

   (Credits: 2)

The church today is confronted with numerous challenging issues, both doctrinal and ethical. A number of these issues will be explored and evaluated on the basis of Gods Word and the Reformed confessions. Winter Semester.